Twelve Natural Ways to Reduce CGRP and Migraines

CGRP is associated with triggering migraines. The next-generation migraine drug blocks CGRP. Here are twelve natural ways to stop CGRP and Migraines:

Twelve Natural Ways to Reduce CGRP and Migraines

CGRP is associated with triggering migraines. The next-generation migraine drug blocks CGRP. Read Part One of this article to find out what CGRP is and why it’s important.

Twelve natural ways to stop CGRP and Migraines:

1.  Ginger suppresses CGRP (study link).

250 mg of ginger was found just as successful as Sumatriptan at immediately halting migraines in a 2014 study (full article).


2.  Butterbur suppresses CGRP (study link).

Butterbur is one of the most powerful migraine treatments (full article).


3.  Grape pomace (dried grape, stem, and pulp) shows an incredibly high suppression of CGRP.

However, this needs to be studied further as there is little research on grape pomace and few supplements are available (study link).


4.  Cacao suppresses CGRP (study 1, 2).

Pure chocolate should not be confused with the candy we refer to as chocolate, which contains various migraine triggers.

You want pure cacao (full article).


5.  New research shows that CGRP is released to regulate inflamed tissue, noxious heat, and pain from the cold (study link).

Cryotherapy treatments reduce inflammation and help the body naturally regulate cold and hot temperatures.

Cryotherapy is also effective in treating migraines (full article).


6.  Coenzyme Q10 decreases CGRP (study link).

There are 16 reasons why coenzyme Q10 will prevent migraines (full article).


7.  Soy is the most common source of isoflavones.

Isoflavones increase CGRP (study link).

There are 14 reasons why soy is a top migraine trigger (full article).


8.  Orange juice contains synephrine.

Research suggests that synephrine may activate CGRP (study link).

Synephrine can increase blood pressure, which may release CGRP (CGRP regulates blood pressure).

There are nine reasons why orange juice triggers migraines (full article).


9.  Quick rises in blood pressure release CGRP (study link).

Strenuous exercise can immediately trigger migraines, possibly from the temporary increase in blood pressure.

Research shows, however, that regular exercise significantly reduces migraines in the long run (full article).

Regular exercise helps control blood pressure and may help control CGRP.


10.  Foods with nitrates increase nitric oxide.

Nitric oxide increases CGRP (study link).

There are eight reasons why foods with nitrites/nitrates trigger migraines (full article).


11.  Caffeine withdrawal causes abnormal blood flow to the brain (study link).

CGRP plays an important role in regulating blood pressure.

Caffeine may temporarily suppress CGRP by constricting blood vessels.

However, becoming dependent on caffeine and missing that morning cup of coffee may result in vasodilation (wide pipes), the release of CGRP, and migraines (full article).


12.  Vitamin D is needed to produce serotonin (study link).

Medications that increase serotonin are successful in reducing CGRP and migraines (study link).

There are eight reasons why vitamin D prevents migraines (full article).


The secret is that oxidative stress releases CGRP (study link). Nearly all migraine triggers are associated with oxidative stress (full article). Reduce oxidative stress and the top migraine triggers (Food Map).

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Author: Jeremy Orozco

Jeremy Orozco is a firefighter turned migraine expert and author of The 3-Day Headache “Cure”. You can find Jeremy here at MigraineKey.com and on Facebook. (See Jeremy's full bio.)



MigraineKey.com is dedicated to eliminating headaches and migraines. Forever.

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This is not medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Read more.